After Bakhtin : Essays on Fiction and Criticism

Bakhtin's theory, therefore, hinges on this binary distinction between dialogism and monologism, a distinction that is really a matter of degree rather than kind, even if he himself sometimes speaks as if it were categorical. His theory also hinges on a stipulated definition: a novel is genuinely a novel if and only if it is dialogical, heteroglot, and polyphonic. Ayn Rand's fiction, then, with its single-minded, one-sided, and didactic discourse on the philosophy of objectivism and the virtue of selfishness, is not in his terms novelistic. Shakespeare's plays, on the other hand, with their subplots and multiple perspectives, deploy variegated social languages that range from the base to the elevated, the bawdy to the sublime, and thus are abundantly novelistic in Bakhtin's sense of the term as is "The Waste Land," a poem constructed almost entirely out of heteroglossia and polyglossia. Nevertheless, Bakhtin's general point holds. Classical tragedy is linguistically homogeneous and embraces the virtues of civic order and unity even if its restorative catharsis can only be achieved through carnage and violence; the Homeric epic is also linguistically homogeneous, invoking the pietistic language of tradition and received value to inscribe the ethos and worldview of Greek culture; and lyric poetry usually embodies a singular semantic intention and expressive intonation. Each of these genres tends to deploy a single voice, perspective, and style.

 Lodge, David. After Bakhtin: Essays on Fiction and Criticism. London: Routledge, 1990.

On David Lodge, After Bakhtin: Essays on Fiction and Criticism (NY: Routledge, 1990), Novel 25 (Winter 1992), 211-13. 13.


After Bakhtin: Essays on Fiction and Criticism

Burke and Bakhtin have at least two things in common. First, both endorse and champion a dialogical theory of language and literature, a theory that is better explained and elaborated by Bakhtin but better enacted and dramatized by Burke. Second, both have compelling metaphors for history and society. For Bakhtin, the social and historical world is to be imagined as "something like an immense novel, multi-generic, multi-styled, mercilessly critical, soberly mocking, reflecting in all its fullness the . . . multiple voices of a given culture, people and epoch. In this huge novel . . . any direct word and especially that of the dominant discourse is reflected as something more or less bounded, typical and characteristic of a particular era, aging, dying, ripe for change and renewal" (DI 60). For Burke, history is "an unending conversation" into which people are thrown (PLF 110), a conversation that has neither a discernable originary cause nor an ultimate teleological endpoint.1


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COURSES TAUGHT:
Freshman English, Writing About Literature, Advanced Composition, Introductory Creative Writing, Intermediate Writing of Poetry, Advanced Writing of Poetry, Graduate Workshop in Writing of Poetry, History of the Lyric, Modern American Poetry, Modern British Poetry, British Literature Since 1850, Twentieth-Century British Literature (senior-level and graduate-level), Twentieth-Century British Novel (senior-level and graduate-level), Anglo-Irish Literature, Graduate Seminar in Irish Literature, Twentieth-Century American Novel (senior-level and graduate-level), Science-Fiction, James Joyce (senior-level and graduate-level), Joyce and Bakhtin (senior-level and graduate-level), Joyce and Cultural Studies (senior-level and graduate-level), Western Literature, Renaissance-Modern (Humanities department)
TEACHING AWARDS:
Teaching Incentive Program award, 1995-96 (first year eligible)
Special award "For Continuing Meritorious Contributions to Undergraduate Research," 1998-99
BOOKS:
1.

StoryAlity #97 – Bio-cultural Dissertations | StoryAlity

The same can be said of almost everything that Burke wrote. His arguments never constitute a seamless whole. There is no figure in the carpet. If you persevere as a reader, you can discover a way in, a way through, and a way out, but the structure of his books is more like a maze than a path. Part One of Attitudes Toward History begins with frames of acceptance and rejection in James, Whitman, and Emerson, devolves into a discussion of poetic categories and instances of transcendence, and ends by circling back to frames of acceptance and the advocacy of comic criticism. Part Two traces the curve of history, taking us from Christian Evangelism to Emergent Collectivism while furnishing comic correctives along the way. Part Three analyzes symbolic structure and the general nature of ritual, ending with a 122 page dictionary of pivotal terms that rehearses the discussion in a non-consecutive fashion. Throughout we are immersed in a polyglot and heteroglot world of Latin, German, French, the language of philosophy, the language of criticism, the language of the street, the language of politics, the language of advertising, and so forth. The invoking of "Unseen Value" in a car advertisement leads to a meditation on the Christ/Chrysler pun (ATH 91n). And lengthy footnotes are in dialogue with the main argument, paratext at times threatening to overwhelm text. And, of course, there is a conclusion, an afterword, an appendix, and a retrospective prospect.