AWP 2014: New Approach to Teaching Creative Writing …

The grain companies (Alberta Wheat Pool included) suffered with the economic recession and as well as the few years of bad harvests, due to poor weather – drought one year and damp another. This hurt the company coffers and bottom line as the elevator agents would have to spend more time drying the damp grain and not shipping it out. Rising inflation hurt the construction of newer high-output elevators (like the BSB elevators), as the older wooden elevators were having trouble keeping up with the new changes in the transportation. It was harder to load grain hopper cars on sidings that were made for grain boxcars, and several elevators couldn’t manage that well. With a fluctuating economy and dwindling profit due to the drought and damp harvest years, it was decided that the pricier BSB elevators would have to be put on hold for the meantime until things improved. It was decided to upgrade and renovate some of the older, larger elevators and to build a few wood cribbed double composite ‘high-output’ grain elevators. Some of the upgrades included new semi-truck capable driveways and scales, increased mechanization and drying equipment inside the elevators, additional steel grain bins added on the exterior, and where if possible the addition of increased railcar capacity up to 12 cars per track, with some places up to 25 car capacity. With the renovated grain elevators and the few new wood cribbed elevators built, the Alberta Wheat Pool was able to get by through this period.

AWP celebrates the writers serving as mentors in the Fall 2017 session of Writer to Writer

Maintaining the buoyant moods of shareholders was essential in keeping schemes like these afloat. Companies like the SALC and CPR appealed to investor immortality, offering to name town sites along newly surveyed branch lines after shareholders and company officials. According to Place Names of Alberta: Southern Alberta (Vol. II), the sidings along the Suffield branch line was no exception:


My Favorite Essay To Teach – Page 4 – Assay: A Journal …

21/11/2016 · Posts about My Favorite Essay To Teach written by Renée E. D'Aoust

The grain companies (Alberta Wheat Pool included) suffered with the economic recession and as well as the few years of bad harvests, due to poor weather (drought one year and damp another) which hurt the company coffers and bottom line as the elevator agents would have to spend more time drying the damp grain and not be able to bring in new grain to get shipped out. Rising inflation hurt the construction of newer high-output elevators (like the BSB elevators), as the older wooden elevators were having trouble keeping up with the new changes in the transportation. It was harder to load grain hopper cars on sidings that were made for grain boxcars, and several elevators couldn’t manage that well. With a fluctuating economy and dwindling profit due to the drought and damp harvest years, it was decided that the pricier BSB elevators would have to be put on hold for the meantime until things improved. It was decided to upgrade and renovate some of the older, larger elevators and to build a few wood cribbed double composite ‘high-output’ grain elevators. Some of the upgrades included new semi-truck capable driveways and scales, increased mechanization and drying equipment inside the elevators, additional steel grain bins added on the exterior, and where if possible the addition of increased railcar capacity up to 12 cars per track, with some places up to 25 car capacity. With the renovated grain elevators and the few new wood cribbed elevators built, the Alberta Wheat Pool was able to get by through this period.


22/06/2015 · “The object of the education system, taken as whole, is not to produce hands for industry or to teach the young how to make a living

Fast forward to January 2017… after visiting the Foremost Buffalo 2000 example last fall, my appetite was whetted and I look forward to going after another local Buffalo example, the Magrath elevator, which I had driven by many times before on the way to and from Waterton Lakes National Park (and often wondered what the heck was that elevator about)? After some initial research and ‘old-fashioned elbow grease’ I was able to contact the current owners of the elevator who still uses the facility (and who graciously allowed us access). Naturally, the crew was at the top of the list of people to be invited to come along on the tour. On a cool weekday afternoon, we arrived at Magrath and with the company’s elevator agent (Richard) unlocking the door, we begun our tour!

Nov 21, 2016 · Posts about My Favorite Essay To Teach written by Renée E. D'Aoust

CPR seemed to change their mind constantly on the line – for a while it was listed to be abandoned, then it would be taken off the list, and then rumors of running oil cars to access the Bakken oil field would start up for a while, and then it would be put on the to be abandoned list. It wasn’t until the Southern Alberta Grain Exchange got serious in 2012 to get the courage to ask CPR on purchasing the remaining 73 km of track that things slowly turned around. Back and forth negotiations occurred and any visible change didn’t occur until the summer of 2016 when twenty grain hoppers were pushed onto the track at the east end near Stirling. Then the grade crossings were fixed up (including replacing the signs that were broken off over the years), a culvert replaced by Foremost, and another over the hill from the Richardson Pioneer high output elevator by Stirling (another former Agricore elevator), and finally a transfer track was installed a bit further east of that elevator (to allow the short line to exchange cars from CPR). In early September, the bright blue J&L Consulting GP-9 locomotive was brought west from Coniston, Ontario and after picking up the 20 grain hoppers from the transfer track it went to its new home at Foremost. It has been steadily moving cars since then, and it is a welcome sight in this local area!