The Best American Essays 2010 (The Best American …

Native Modernism: The Art of George Morrison and Allan Houser showcases magnificent paintings, drawings, and sculptures by two highly acclaimed artists. George Morrison (Grand Portage Band of Chippewa, 1919–2000) and Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994) shattered expectations for Native art and paved the way for successive generations to experiment with a wide array of styles and techniques. In this ground-breaking, beautifully illustrated book, distinguished Native American writers and scholars Truman T. Lowe (Ho-Chunk), Gerald Vizenor (Chippewa), N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa), and Gail Tremblay (Onondaga/Mi´qmaq) provide a fascinating exploration of the two men’s work in the context of contemporary art, Native American art history, and cultural identity.

The best american essays 2010 by Natalie Gutierrez - issuu

Looking to the Future: The Life and Legacy of Senator Daniel K. Inouye honors one of history’s greatest advocates for Native people—Senator Daniel K. Inouye (1924–2012), former chairman and vice chairman of the US Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and one of the visionary founders of the National Museum of the American Indian. A person deeply grounded in values, community, and family, Senator Inouye’s myriad accomplishments include, among others, legislation and support for strengthening Native sovereignty, treaties, governance, economic development, education, and health care. This volume is a compilation of edited presentations by the distinguished speakers who participated in the NMAI symposium, “Looking to the Future: The Life and Legacy of Senator Daniel K. Inouye,” held on May 15, 2014. This selective group of tribal leaders, political associates, culture keepers, education and health care specialists, and museum professionals reflect on Senator Inouye’s many contributions to the well-being of Native America and a future that builds upon the foundation of the senator's legacy for the benefit of future generations of Native people.


Best African American essays, 2010 (Book, 2010) …

Best African American essays, 2010

Officially Indian explores the symbolic importance of American Indians in the visual language of U.S. democracy since before the country’s founding. In the first in-depth study of this extraordinary archive—including maps, monuments and architectural features, stamps, and currency—the author argues that these representations are not empty symbols but reflect how official and semi-official government institutions, from the U.S. Army and the Department of the Treasury to the patriotic fraternal society Sons of Liberty, have attempted to define what the country stands for. American Indian imagery—almost invariably distorted and bearing little relation to the reality of Native American–U.S. government relations—sheds light on the United States’ evolving sense of itself as a democratic nation. Such images as a Plains Indian buffalo hunter on the 1898 four-cent stamp and Sequoyah’s likeness etched into glass doors at the Library of Congress in 2013 reveal how deeply rooted American Indians are in U.S. national identity. While the meanings embedded in these artifacts can be paradoxical, counterintuitive, and contradictory to their eras’ prevailing attitudes toward actual American Indians, the imagery has been crucial to the ongoing national debate over what it means to be an American.