All his novels, essays, articles, reviews, bibliography and biography

The “Reviews” section consists of forty-two pieces, mostly book reviews but also including some responses to essays, introductions to anthologies, and retrospective assessments. There are discussions of bibliographical classics by Fredson Bowers, Philip Gaskell, D. F. McKenzie, Paul Needham, Allan Stevenson, and David Vander Meulen, as well as of titles by other major scholars, such as Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, Anthony Grafton, and David McKitterick. Also treated are books by William A. Jackson, Larry McMurtry, and Nicholson Baker, plus several bibliographies, bibliographical reference works, books on book collecting, and scholarly editions. Other items involve bookcloth, Blake’s printmaking, textual theory, book preservation, and the antiquarian book trade.

How to reference bibliography in essay

Peterson, Jennifer . 2013. Animals in Film and Media, in Krin Gabbard (ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Cinema and Media Studies. New York: Oxford University Press.


Annotated Bibliography – Fox Essays

Anthology of essays by scholars examining the interaction between gender and race within the Movement and its legacy.

Vander Meulen recounts the series of decisions that are involved in creating a descriptive bibliography. There is no clearer account of that process, or one more likely to promote sympathetic understanding of the field. In doing so, Vander Meulen’s Engelhard Lecture displays the human side of scholarship and clarifies the essential place of bibliography in the humanities.


Noam Chomsky bibliography and filmography - …

G. Thomas Tanselle, former vice president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and adjunct professor of English at Columbia University, is president of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia and co-editor of the Northwestern-Newberry Edition of the writings of Herman Melville. He has previously served as president of the Bibliographical Society of America, the Grolier Club, and the Society for Textual Scholarship. His collection of American imprints is in the Beinecke Library at Yale, where his assemblage of nineteenth-century book-jackets will soon be placed as well.

Harvard Reference Generator: Referencing a Journal …

This illustrated book is intended as a compact introduction to the historical study of book-jackets (or dust-jackets), which—though removable from the books they cover—are essential parts of those books as published. It is a history both of publishers’ detachable book coverings (primarily British and American) and of the attention they have received from scholars, dealers, collectors, and librarians. It also surveys their use by publishers (as protective devices and advertising media) and their usefulness to scholars of literature, art, and book history (as sources for biography, bibliography, cultural analysis, and the development of graphic design). In effect, the book constitutes a plea for the preservation and cataloguing of this significant class of material, so that it will be available for future examination.

Bibliography | George R.R. Martin

Two of them deal with individual periodicals ( and the Bibliographical Society’s ) and two with the development of descriptive bibliographies (of American authors and eighteenth-century books). Other essays cover the writing of publishing history, the theorizing about the scientific nature of bibliography, the recording of copyrighted books, the indexing of bibliographical periodicals, and the preserving of booksellers’ catalogues. One takes up the production of a major reference work (the ESTC), and another the role of a single locality (Indianapolis) in book history. The Grolier Club is the subject of two contrasting styles of history: a journalistic account of current events (the Club’s centenary festivities) and a retrospective investigation of a bibliographical activity (the mounting of exhibitions as practiced at the Club). The fiftieth anniversary of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia also receives journalistic treatment. Textual criticism and scholarly editing have a place here because they are so intimately tied to the study of the physical objects that transmit texts. The two essays on textual matters explore, first, the traditions of scholarly editing and, second, how those traditions have been applied or misapplied to visual and aural works. A final essay, serving as an epilogue to the volume, discusses bibliographical history as a field, defining it, surveying previous work to build on, and suggesting the value of producing more such work.