Self-interest in Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe

In fact, it is through his relationship with Friday the negative traits of his character and the darker side of his personality is revealed. In this respect, it should be said that since the beginning of their acquaintance, the main character has started to dominate over Friday. The fact that this was a native, uneducated and uncivilized person, from the point of view of a European, became probably determinant in the attitude of Robinson Crusoe to his companion. The main character feels his superiority in relation to Friday. He is convinced that his companion is a primitive being who conscious is not formed and whose perception of the surrounding world is naïve, while his moral is absolutely savage and unacceptable for a civilized man. This is why he starts to trait Friday as inferior person, dominates over him and teaches him not only language but also Christian philosophy and even lifestyle.

These three things are evident in Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe....

In the course of the novel his efforts and enthusiasm are rewarded: his household grows more solid, he starts farming successfully, and finally, he finds a companion, whom he calls Friday and, whom he actually saves from the terrible death from the hands of the natives. As a result, it is really difficult to get rid of the impression that the main character is so positive that any criticism of his actions or revealing some negative traits is practically impossible. However, it is actually the moment when Robinson Crusoe finds a companion when his real nature is fully revealed and readers can understand what a kind of person the main character actually is.


self-interest with respect to the character of Robinson Crusoe.

In this novel we meet Robinson Crusoe who is stranded on a uninhabited island.

In a conversation about Jackie Robinson’s influence on Martin Luther King Jr., Assistant Professor of History at the University of Missouri Kansas City Pellom McDaniels III, once stated that because of Robinson’s perseverance and stren...


Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe Essay - 582 Words

Robinson Crusoe, the main character in Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe, gets himself into many troubles because of his decisions based on self-interest and greed.

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In Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe not only depicts the struggle of a man abandoned on a deserted island, but also depicts Crusoe's repentance for past disobedience against his father and humanity as well as his acceptance of religion into his life.

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Robinson Crusoe Essays (1903 words) - English …

However, upon second thoughts, I took it away..." (Defoe 57) It is easy to take Crusoe's statement literally and dismiss him merely as an ostentatious person; however, Crusoe sees real beauty in the saving hand of God. The dominant theme in Robinson Crusoe is that sin ha...

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In crossing the color-barrier in baseball Robinson not only strived as a great player on the field, but also a inspiration to the black community of the field with his humility, and willingness to move forward in a time where blacks were not considered “equal”....

ESSAY ON ROBINSON CRUSOE DANIEL DEFOE

In Daniel Defoe’s fictional novel, Robin Crusoe, the protagonist, Robin Crusoe, manages to show his attitudes concerning the non-Europeans, more specifically his servant, Friday, the Portuguese captain, and nature in general....