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the repetition of a word or phrase to achieve a particular effect.

Accordingly, in Augustine's view, any hypothetically perfect things (like God or heaven in Christian theology) by definition do not and cannot change, and therefore these perfect things must not experience time as imperfect humanity does. They are sub specie aeternitatis, outside of time completely and viewing all things in the bubble at time simultaneously. Accordingly, states of time (past, present, and future) are merely illusions we experience. The past only appears to be over and the future only appears not to have happened yet because our mortal perception is limited to the present moment rather than experiencing all reality at once. In Saint Augustine's thinking, perfect and spiritual beings outside of time experience or observe past, present, and future simultaneously. For Saint Augustine, this idea of time allows God to have knowledge of future events and choices humans make while preserving human free will, suggesting God can know what choices we will make tomorrow (because we actually have already made the choices), without God necessarily causing those choices to happen through his own influence--foreknowledge without causation. In terms of God's perceptions, all those future choices already happened and are done with--humans just don't know it yet.

Helping Teachers with Lesson Plans — A Resource for Intentional Parents

— Comedy of Manners — (World/England; Drama/England; SEL: Romantic Relationships; Moral-Ethical Emphasis: Trustworthiness) [12+]


ACYROLOGIA: Also called acyrology, see discussion under .

the version of language spoken by particular people in a particular area, such as Scots.

ACMEISM: A 1912 Russian poetry movement reacting against the Symbolist movement (Harkins 1). Acmeists protested against the mystical tendencies of the Symbolists; they opposed ambiguity in poetry, calling for a return to precise, concrete imagery. Prominent members of the movement include Nikolay Gumilyov and Sergey Gorodetski.


Many Anglo-Saxon charms may have been apotropaic chants.

AISLING (Irish Gaelic: "dream, vision," pronounced "ash-ling"): a genre of Irish political poetry popular in the 1600s and 1700s in which a appears who mourns the recent down-fallen status of Ireland and predicts a coming return to fortune, often linked with the return of a Stuart ruler to the throne of Britain. In later centuries, the form often became used satirically or jokingly. The most famous example of aisling poetry is Róisín Dubh, and the earliest major aisling poet was Aodhagán Ó Rathaille, often called the father of the aisling. Cf. .

ASC: An alternative spelling for or aesc.

Learning Outcomes/Objectives: Students studying American Literature will gain a sense of the writing of Nathaniel Hawthorne and see connections between his advanced thinking and similar themes found in pop culture. Students will observe the same ideas presented in two different media from two different time periods. They will practice expressing their ideas in a compare/contrast essay.

В соцсетях появились ироничные карикутуры.

AKEDAH: The akedah is a section of Genesis including Genesis 22:1-19, of foundational importance in the three Abrahamic traditions of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism.

Сооружение еще надеются спасти, и найти инвесторов.

Learner Outcomes/Objectives: Students will practice deriving theme from a scene in a novel that has been adapted to film.

Rationale: The fishing scene from is a powerful presentation of a thematic concept. In addition, students reading Ken Kesey's novel will enjoy seeing the film's presentation of this important scene.

Description: In this classic scene from , Randall Patrick McMurphy, played by Jack Nicholson, takes fellow inmates of the mental institution on an unauthorized fishing trip. The joyful energy spent catching the fish shows on the faces of the inmates; they have become happy, successful men rather than the troubled spirits they are at the hospital. Whether or not students read the book or see the entire movie, the snippet illustrates one of the film's ideas: society determines what is crazy and what is not crazy and this determination is created through observable behavior; in other words, crazy is as crazy does.