Religion Research Papers, Essays, Term Papers on Religion

These ideas had an enormous impact on German religious thought in the 19th century, and through it on Protestantism and Judaism throughout the West. This was the century of “liberal theology,” a term that requires explanation. In modern Britain and the United States, it was assumed that the intellectual, and then institutional, separation of Christianity and modern politics had been mutually beneficial — that the modern state had benefited by being absolved from pronouncing on doctrinal matters, and that Christianity had benefited by being freed from state interference. No such consensus existed in Germany, where the assumption was that religion needed to be publicly encouraged, not reined in, if it was to contribute to society. It would have to be rationally reformed, of course: the Bible would have to be interpreted in light of recent historical findings, belief in miracles abandoned, the clergy educated along modern lines and doctrine adapted to a softer age. But once these reforms were in place, enlightened politics and enlightened religion would join hands.

Religion Essay Samples | Religion Paper Writing Help

Wise and good people can be found in various cultures at various times and among both religious believers and non-believers. Among such people I have written long essays on are two converts to Catholicism, Schumacher and American helper-of-the-poor Dorothy Day. Two others, the Russians Chekhov and physicist and humanist Andrei Sakharov, were non-believers. A fifth, the poet and Lincoln biographer Carl Sandburg, once said: “I am a Christian, a Quaker, a Moslem, a Buddhist, a Shintoist, a Confucian, and maybe a Catholic pantheist or a Joan of Arc who hears voices. I am all of these and more. Definitely I have more religions than I have time or zeal to practice in true faith.”


Essay Sample On Religion In America For School Students

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In his introduction to American Religious Liberalism, a volume he coedited with Sally Promey, Schmidt keenly observes the presence of what he calls “spiritual-secular ambivalence” among 19th-century religious liberals. These liberals consumed ideas about scientific materialism as voraciously as they read about a spiritual realm beyond the limits of the material world. Fellow travelers in free thinking, it can be difficult to tell the secularists apart from the religious, because sometimes they identified as both. For Unitarians and nonbelieving Jews, this ambiguity still exists today, and it can be tough to parse the secular from the religious.


BBC - Future - Will religion ever disappear?

There are pessimists who hold that such a state of affairs is necessarilyinherent in human nature; it is those who propound such views that arethe enemies of true religion, for they imply thereby that religious teachingsare utopian ideals and unsuited to afford guidance in human affairs. Thestudy of the social patterns in certain so-called primitive cultures, however,seems to have made it sufficiently evident that such a defeatist view iswholly unwarranted. Whoever is concerned with this problem, a crucial onein the study of religion as such, is advised to read the description ofthe Pueblo Indians in Ruth Benedict's book, .Under the hardest living conditions, this tribe has apparently accomplishedthe difficult task of delivering its people from the scourge of competitivespirit and of fostering in it a temperate, cooperative conduct of life,free of external pressure and without any curtailment of happiness.

Nielsen's Psychology of Religion Pages

It is this mythical, or rather this symbolic, content of the religioustraditions which is likely to come into conflict with science. This occurswhenever this religious stock of ideas contains dogmatically fixed statementson subjects which belong in the domain of science. Thus, it is of vitalimportance for the preservation of true religion that such conflicts beavoided when they arise from subjects which, in fact, are not really essentialfor the pursuance of the religious aims.

Psychology of Religion Research and Teaching Exchange

In the nineteenth and early twentieth century, authors from newlyemerging scientific disciplines, such as anthropology, sociology, andpsychology, examined the purported naturalistic roots of religiousbelief. They did so with a broad brush, trying to explain what unifiesdiverse religious beliefs across cultures, rather than accounting forcultural variations. In anthropology, the idea that all culturesevolve and progress along the same lines (cultural evolutionism) waswidespread. Cultures with differing religious views were explained asbeing in an early stage of development. For example, Tylor (1871)regarded animism, the belief that spirits animate the world, as theearliest form of religious belief. Comte (1841) proposed that allsocieties, in their attempts to make sense of the world, go throughthe same stages of development: the theological (religious) stage isthe earliest phase, where religious explanations predominate, followedby the metaphysical stage (a non-intervening God), and culminating inthe positive or scientific stage, marked by scientific explanationsand empirical observations.