River Cities Community Credit Union

It is tempting to rush in and buy a product quickly as they advertise flights and flight credits etc and it is hard to compare apples with apples so to speak. Hoping you can help us book our European River cruise and save a significant amount.

Welcome to River Cities Community Credit Union

In the past we didn’t designed gardens that play a critical ecological role in the landscape, but we must do so in the future if we hope to avoid a mass extinction from which humans are not likely to recover either. As quickly as possible we need to replace unnecessary lawn with densely planted woodlots that can serve as habitat for our local biodiversity. Homeowners can do this by planting the borders of their properties with native trees plants such as white oaks (Quercus alba), black willows (Salix nigra), red maples (Acer rubrum), green ashes (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), black walnuts (Juglans nigra), river birches (Betula nigra) and shagbark hickories (Carya ovata), under-planted with woodies like serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis), arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum), hazelnut (Corylus americnus), blueberries (Vaccinium spp) . Our studies have shown that even modest increases in the native plant cover on suburban properties significantly increases the number and species of breeding birds, including birds of conservation concern. As gardeners and stewards of our land, we have never been so empowered to help save biodiversity from extinction, and the need to do so has never been so great. All we need to do is plant native plants!


Astrud Gilberto - Official Homepage

HOME AG STORE BIOGRAPHY DISCOGRAPHY ESSAY INTERVIEW SCRAP BOOK ART MASCOTS

- The impact of their words is heightened by the unsettling understanding that, as Seattle suggested, "we may be brothers after all;" that the fate meted out to native people may redound upon their dispossessors. The historic development of the Pacific Northwest that began with the alienation of its aboriginal inhabitants came with a price that must be paid, and Dr. Jay Miller's second essay examines the salmon, once the daily bread of groups throughout the region, but now an endangered resource and an icon of environmental fragility. The miraculous reappearance of the fish in the rivers year after year evoked a sense of awe and reverence from the native people who managed this resource with intelligence and care. Two salmon stories, one from the coast and another from the interior, capture the sense of mystery surrounding the fishes' nature as well as the epic quality of its return and the hope it inspired, a hope now threatened.